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Beatriz González. Decoración de interiores, 1981. Engraving, silkscreen. 106 x 140 in. Colección de Arte del Banco de la República. Colombia
 


María Fernanda Cardoso. Cementerio, jardín vertical, 1992. Installation. Variable measures. Colección de Arte del Banco de la República. Colombia
 


Alejandro Obregón. Estudio para violencia, 1962. Oil on madeflex. 9 x 12 in. Colección de Arte del Banco de la República. Colombia
 


Fernando Arias. Mucha India, 2014. Hand knitting. 122 x 72 in. Colección de Arte del Banco de la República. Colombia
 

 
Exhibition
"Cross Country. Colombian Art in the Collection of the Banco de la República"
Sala Alcalá 31

20/February/2018



Madrid, Spain


From February 20 to April 22 of 2018, the Sala Alcalá31 in Madrid presents "Cross Country. Colombian Art in the Collection of the Banco de la República," an exhibition consisting of over one hundred works of art. The show centers around the production in Colombia by more than 60 artists including: Doris Salcedo, Alejandro Obregón, and Beatriz González. Also on display are works from other historical periods like the Colonial era.


The show was curated by Estrella de Diego and is articulated around three central concepts: "Anatomy and Botany," "Travel Guide," and "Invisible Cities," in a survey aimed at showcasing the diversity of Colombian art.


In "Anatomy and Botany," the mortal body becomes a body of desire through a collection that ranges from historical canvases depicting dead nuns to homoerotic anatomies by Luis Caballero. Abused bodies by Obregón share the space with the crippled anatomies of Bernardo Salcedo and the metaphors found in the broken geometries created by Doris Salcedo.


The second section, "Travel Guide," addresses diversity in a fascinating country defined by contraststhrough reflections on the historical dialog between diversities. In this manner, the native element in the work by Beatriz González coexists with the African heritage of Colombia found in the works of Ramón Torres-Méndez and Liliana Angulo.


The third and last section, "Invisible Cities," consists of a narrative told through representations of the antithesis between the urban and the rural or the abundant and the scarce, a concept that Colombian photography has resumed, from the photographs by Luis B. Ramos to those by Fernell Franco.


The art collection of the Banco de la República began to be formed in the 1950s as result of, on the one hand, the modernizing force that swept Colombia, opening doors to artists and art currents from around the world, and, on the other, the push by then manager Luis Ángel Arango.


Today, the collection has become a national and international referent that allows curators in and out of the collection to explore and research Colombian art. The collection has kept a continuous program of acquisitions and, in 2015, was awarded the International Prize for Collecting granted by the Arco Fair.


 





 


 

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